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The Wilcox home on the web…

Recently I’ve started a little web design venture with www.lightbulbwebdesign.co.uk

I’m offering cost effective web design in Carlisle, Cumbria and beyond – get in touch if we can help out, prices are very competitive!

Take a look at my website and portfolio at the link above for further information.

http://www.noknok.tv/2013/12/11/nokia-lumia-2520-tablet-review-real-world-review/

The Northern England Yoshinkan Dojo is dedicated to the study of Traditional Japanese Martial Arts:

http://www.northlakesjujutsu.co.uk/home.htm

Our style is Moto-ha Yoshin Ryu Jujutsu (a branch of the Hontai Yoshin Ryu Takagi Ryu lineage), under Soke Yasumoto Akiyoshi.

More information about the history of the Hontai Yoshin Ryu-Takagi Ryu lineage can be found in the archive section on our website:

http://www.northlakesjujutsu.co.uk/archive.htm

The dojo is the headquarters of The North Lakes Jujutsu Association, an independent not for profit martial arts association based in Carlisle, and is the Motoha Yoshin Ryu headquarters for the UK under the supervision of the British Hombu-cho Andy McCormack.

The North Lakes Jujutsu Association was founded in 1992 by Andy McCormack and training partner Martin Elliot, with the aims of furthering their study of traditional Japanese Jujutsu, and to promote authentic Japanese Jujutsu in Cumbria and the North.

We were initially introduced to Yasumoto Soke as teenagers, when at that time (mid-1980s) as a Menkyo Kaiden teacher of Hontai Yoshin Ryu, Yasumoto sensei visited the UK teaching Hontai Yoshin Ryu Jujutsu to the World Jujitsu Federation.

Since then the standard of jujutsu and the North Lakes Jujutsu Association has grown from strength to strength, and in 2008 the association opened the Nelson Street Dojo, that features a 132m2, matted training area, changing rooms & showers, a full range of striking equipment (bags, pads, mok jong), members lockers, weight training equipment, and training weapons.

Sessions run:

Monday – Adults and older juniors – 7:30pm to 9:30pm (Please check in advance of attending)
Tuesday – Younger juniors (5+) 6:30pm to 7:30pm, Adults and older juniors 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Wednesday – Black belt training by appointment (Please check in advance of attending)
Thursday – Adults and older juniors – 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Friday – Adults and older juniors – 7:30pm to 9:30pm (Please check I advance of attending)

It is really worth getting in touch beforehand, so we know to expect you :)

If anyone would like any further information please contact us via the information on our website contact page:

http://www.northlakesjujutsu.co.uk/contact.htm

Below are some photos and videos from my recent trip to Japan with the UK branch of Motoha Yoshin Ryu JuJutsu – enjoy!

Famous at last on Japanese TV!

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taikai

soketraining

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There is often a great deal of confusion over ‘back pressure’ and how it is ‘needed’ to gain power – this post is a re-hash of one I posted on a popular car forum a few years ago.

What is back pressure?

Back pressure is (in simple terms) the resistance to the gas flow in the exhaust system. The car exhaust is designed to get the exhaust gas out of the cylinder quickly and efficiently – the more efficient the exhaust is, the more exhaust gas is removed from the cylinders leaving them with more space to fill with new unburnt air and fuel.

When designed correctly, the exhaust gas movement can actually scavenge the exhaust gas from the cylinders leaving a vacuum within the cylinder – this can mean that it is possible for the cylinder to fill with more than it’s rated capacity of air, so yes, it is possible to get more air into the engine, even on NA engines!

Exhaust design

The pipework length/diameter has a big effect on how much back pressure is present in the exhaust system (this includes the design of the exhaust manifold/header).

Increasing the diameter of the exhaust pipes (for most people, this will be through a change of the catback pipework so centre section and backbox) will result in a slower exhaust gas velocity. Reducing the gas velocity will then result in a rise in back pressure. It is this reduction in gas velocity that, at lower and mid-range rpms will actually increase back pressure and in turn reduce the power output in this rpm range. Depending on the increase in size, you could potentially lose power across the whole rpm range of the engine.

When you add a straight through catback exhaust system to your car, even if you stick to the OEM pipe diameter, you are generally removing restrictions which were present in the old system. At lower and mid-range rpms this can often have the effect of losing power low end, and upping it towards the top end of the rpm range. This is why many people find that a new catback exhaust system has left their car feeling sluggish when driving at low rpms, but feels better at the top end (where the old exhaust restrictions were limiting gas velocity and therefore limiting top end power).

What you really want is an exhaust pipe that is as narrow as possible whilst keeping back pressure as close to zero as possible – the diameter of the pipe is determined by the preferred peak power rpm range. A small diameter pipe will give higher gas velocity at lower rpm hence a power band lower down the rpm range, whereas a larger diameter pipe will give higher gas velocity at the higher rpm range, hence a power band higher up the rpm range.

The idea that back pressure is needed is completely incorrect – what you actually need is a high gas velocity and as little back pressure as possible.